2008 Domenici Conference Speakers

James A. Baker, III

James A. Baker, III has served in senior government positions under three U.S. presidents, including secretary of state under George H. W. Bush. During his tenure at the U.S. State Department, Baker traveled to 90 foreign countries as the United States confronted the unprecedented challenges and opportunities of the post-Cold War era. Baker’s record of public service began in 1975 as undersecretary of commerce under President Gerald Ford. From 1981 until 1985, he served as White House chief of staff to President Ronald Reagan and later served as Reagan’s treasury secretary from 1985 to 1988. As treasury secretary, he was also chair of the President’s Economic Policy Council. His public service career concluded with his service as White House chief of staff and senior counselor to President George H.W. Bush from August 1992 to January 1993. His memoir, “Work Hard, Study… and Keep Out of Politics! Adventures and Lessons from and Unexpected Public Life,” was published in October 2006.

Jeff Bingaman

Jeff Bingaman’s political career began when he was elected New Mexico’s attorney general in 1978. In that office, he earned a reputation as a thoughtful and dedicated public official. In 1982, he won election to the U.S. Senate. Since then, his seniority in the Senate and his leadership positions on key committees have allowed him to champion issues important to New Mexico. He has served on numerous Senate committees, including the Energy and Natural Resources, Finance, Joint Economic, and Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committees. His determination to solve real problems facing New Mexico’s families and communities has put him at the forefront on a range of issues, including crime fighting, providing affordable healthcare, improving schools, developing renewable energy, protecting natural resources and creating and retaining good jobs across the state and the nation.

Garrey Carruthers

Garrey Carruthers has enjoyed a varied and interesting professional life. He began his teaching career at New Mexico State University doing his favorite thing – guiding students. He twice “did time” in Washington, D.C., first as a White House fellow assigned to the secretary of agriculture and then as assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior during the Reagan administration. He was a successful governor of New Mexico, serving as the last of the constitutionally limited, four-year, single-term governors. His entrepreneurial spirit lead him next into the healthcare business, where he served as president and CEO of Cimarron Health Plan, a home-grown managed care company. He returned to his roots in 2003 to become dean of the NMSU College of Business. He also serves as vice president for economic development at NMSU.

Waded Cruzado

Waded Cruzado was formerly New Mexico State University’s executive vice president and provost. She served as NMSU’s interim president from 2008 to 2009. As executive vice president and provost, Cruzado provided leadership for the accreditation visit by the Higher Learning Commission in 2008, which resulted in NMSU being recommended for full accreditation for a ten-year term. Previous to becoming provost, she served a four-year term as dean of the NMSU College of Arts and Sciences, providing oversight and leadership to the largest academic unit at the university. She also has served as an ex-officio member of the NMSU Foundation Board, a co-principal investigator of the ADVANCE Program for Institutional Transformation, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, and a member of the Investment Committee, the Audit Committee and the Board of Directors for the Paso del Norte Health Foundation.

Diane Denish

Diane D. Denish is the first woman to be elected lieutenant governor in New Mexico. A lifelong New Mexican, she was raised in Hobbs and has lived, worked and come to know residents throughout the state. She is the former chair of the Democratic Party of New Mexico and for 12 years owned a successful small business. Named one of the Top 100 New Mexicans in honor of her community leadership, the lieutenant governor has served as chair of New Mexico First, New Mexico Community Foundation, the state’s Commission on the Status of Women and the New Mexico Tech board of Regents. During her time in office, she has fought to improve education by expanding pre-kindergarten programs across the state and getting state agencies to band together to prepare the “Educonomy” of our future workforce. She signed into law bills creating the Children’s Cabinet and the Next Generation Fund to support positive after-school activities.

Christopher J. Dodd

Connecticut’s Chris Dodd is a senior Democratic leader in the U.S. Senate. Sen. Dodd is perhaps best known for bringing much-needed attention to children’s issues. He formed the first children’s caucus in the Senate and spent eight years fighting to enact the Family and Medical Leave Act, which has helped ensure that 50 million Americans don’t have to choose between the job they need and the family they love. Dodd has long believed that “the best social program is a good job.” Toward that end, he has dedicated himself to helping Americans create and win the best jobs in the 21st century global economy. He is a long-time supporter of job-training initiatives that enable American workers to acquire higher-skilled, better-paying jobs. He co-authored the landmark Sarbanes-Oxley law, which has strengthened accounting and managerial practices for the benefit of companies and those workers who invest in them. In addition, he is a long-term supporter of the Research and Development Tax Credit and of greater investments in scientific research to spur innovation and job creation.

Mike Fitzpatrick

Michael Fitzpatrick is executive director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). Until 2004, Fitzpatrick served both as director of NAMI’s Policy Research Institute and as NAMI’s national director of policy. Prior to joining NAMI in 1999, Fitzpatrick was employed by the Spurwick Institute, a nationally accredited non-profit organization that provides behavioral health, educational and residential services. He also has been employed in senior management positions in state government, with non-profit agencies and in the private sector. He has developed successful education, employment, housing, outreach and rehabilitation programs. Fitzpatrick has served on numerous community, government and non-profit boards and expert panels. From 1994 until 1996, he served as the chair of the House Health and Human Services Committee. He also served as president of the board of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program in his home state of Maine.

Siegfried S. Hecker

Siegfried S. Hecker is co-director of the Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation, senior fellow of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and research professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He also is an emeritus director of Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he served as director from 1986 until 1997, and as a senior fellow until 2005. Hecker’s current professional interests include plutonium research, cooperative nuclear threat reduction with the Russian nuclear complex and global nonproliferation and counter terrorism. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and served as a counselor for that organization. He is chair of the Joint U.S./Russian Academies Committee on Counterterrorism Challenges in Russia and the United States and serves on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Cooperation Nonproliferation Panel. He is a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Metallurgical Society and ASM International.

Bill Hoagland

Bill Hoagland spent 33 years in federal government service, 25 as a staff member in the U.S. Senate. In 2007, CIGNA Corporation appointed him vice president of public policy to develop CIGNA policy, particularly on healthcare reform issues at both the federal and state levels. From 2003 to 2006, he served as the director of budget and appropriations in the office of Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist. In 1997 and 2005, National Journal listed him as one of the Washington 100 Decision Makers and referred to him as a “bottom-liners who is not a hard-liner.” Roll Call, the daily publication of Capital Hill, consistently named Hoagland as one of the top 50 Hill Staffers. In 2002, he received to James L. Blum Award for Distinguished Service in Budgeting. The National Association of State Budget Officers honored him in 2004 with its Leadership in Budgeting Award and in 2006 he was inducted as a fellow in the National Academy of Public Administration.

Manuel Lujan, Jr.

Manuel Lujan, Jr. served as representative for New Mexico’s 1st Congressional District from 1969 to 1989. While in Congress, he served on the Interior and Insular Affairs and the Science, Space and Technology Committees, as well as the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. In 1978, Lujan became one of the five inaugural members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, a group of Hispanic Representatives dedicated to voicing and advancing, through legislative process, issues affecting Hispanics in the United States and Puerto Rico. In addition to his congressional duties, Lujan has represented New Mexico as a delegate to every Republican National Convention from 1972 to 2004. In 1989, he was unanimously confirmed as the secretary of the interior, a position he held until 1993. During his service as secretary, he worked toward economic security through resource development while maintaining environmental protections to ensure quality of life.

Michael Martin

Michael V. Martin is the chancellor of Louisiana State University and a former president of New Mexico State University from 2004 until 2008. He was the recipient of the Justin Smith Morrill Memorial Award in 2007. The national award, named after the author of the bill that created land-grant universities, honors and recognizes outstanding service on behalf of the land-grant mission. Only six individuals have received the award since it was first given in 1980. Convinced that NMSU is a hidden jewel in higher education, Martin laid the groundwork for university-wide extension and created the J. Paul Taylor Social Justice Symposium. In his short time at NMSU, the first capital campaign was established with a goal of raising $150 million by 2010. The campaign met its goal in the first half of the seven-year fundraising plan, and the university is now heading toward a new goal of $225 million. During his tenure, Martin focused on research conducted at NMSU. He oversaw the establishment of a system of research clusters that focus on five areas in which NMSU scientists and researchers have expertise: 21st century aerospace, information sciences, biosciences, Southwest border issues and natural resources.

Bill Richardson

Bill Richardson is serving his second term as governor of New Mexico. As governor he has shifted education money from administration to the classroom, cut taxes for working families and raised the minimum wage. Richardson served as representative for New Mexico’s 3rd Congressional District from 1983 until 1997. As a congressman, he sponsored and passed a bill to retain and improve heath care for rural New Mexicans and a bill to increase the amount of nurses in the state. He traveled to Missouri and convinced milk producers to open a dairy factory in eastern New Mexico, creating jobs and bringing economic development to the state. Congressman Richardson served as a special envoy on many sensitive international missions and successfully won the release of hostages, American servicemen and prisoners in North Korea, Iraq, Sudan and Cuba. Richardson has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize five times in recognition of his concern for human rights abuses and his diplomatic work throughout the world.

C. Paul Robinson

Since 1991, C. Paul Robinson has served on the Strategic Advisory Group for the Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, where he chaired the policy panel from 1992 until 2005. He also serves on the U.S. Nuclear Command and Control System Comprehensive Review Committee for Defense Secretary Robert Gates. Robinson was president of Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, and director of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) from 1995 until 2005. Under his leadership, SNL diversified its mission support activities to include larger efforts in nuclear weapons design and development, nonproliferation and material control around the world, counterterrorism, homeland security and support for the Department of Defense and intelligence communities.